Myricetin – A Brain Boosting, Heart Healthy Phytonutrient

Myricetin is a flavonol and phytonutrient (a group of chemical compounds that can be found in plants and have numerous health benefits but are not considered essential to human health) which supports brain and heart health. In this article I will be discussing myricetin in greater detail and providing you with a summary of its main functions, the best food sources, the recommended daily allowances (RDAs) and the potentially adverse effects of consuming too much or too little.

1) DISCOVERY:

Myricetin was discovered by the Hungarian biochemist Albert Szent-Gyorgyi in 1938 as part of the flavonoid family. Gyorgyi initially believed that he had discovered a new vitamin and so named the flavonoids vitamin P. However, it was later discovered that unlike vitamins, the flavonoids are not essential to human health.

2) FUNCTION:

Like many of the flavonols, myricetin is a powerful antioxidant which protects your body’s cells from damaging free radicals (harmful by-products that are released during oxygen related reactions). It can also protect against many different cancers (including breast cancer, colonĀ Noocube near me cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer) and keep the body’s deoxyribonucleic acid (a carrier of important genetic information which is often referred to as DNA) safe from damage. Additionally, myricetin can reduce inflammation within the body, reduce blood levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (which keeps the heart healthy) and treat diarrhea.

A small number of studies suggest that myricetin may also be a key nutrient for brain health and assist in the treatment of mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. However, more research needs to be done before these health benefits can be linked concretely with myricetin consumption.

3) RDA:

Myricetin is not believed to be essential in humans so no RDA has been established for this flavonol.

4) FOOD SOURCES:

Most fruits and vegetables contain some myricetin. However, blueberries (2.66 milligrams (mg) per 100 grams (g)), cranberries (6.78mg per 100g) and red onions (2.7mg per 100g) are amongst the best food sources.